Upcoming Activities

Sept 1: Labor Day; NO SCHOOL

Sept 4: JV/V VB @ Mullen; 5/6:00; Early Dismissal Teacher Inservice (1:45)

Sept 5: V FB @ Maxwell; 7:00

Sept 8: JV Football @ Stapleton; 5:00

Sept 10: JH VB @ Stapleton

Sept 12: JV/V VB, V FB v. Stapleton @ Arnold; 5/6/7:30

Sept 13: V VB Seven Valleys Tournament @ Callaway; 9:30

Sept 15: JH/JV VB/FB @ Arnold; 2:30 JH VB, 4:30 JV VB/JH FB, 5:30 JV Football

Sept 16: V VB Triangular @ Brady; 5:00

Sept 18: JV V VB SEM @ Callaway; 5:30/6:30

Sept 19: V FB v. Hemmingford @ Arnold; 6:00

Sept 22: JH VB/FB, JV FB @ Ansley-Litchfield; 3:30/5:30/6:30

Sept 23: JV/V VB Quad @ Merna TBA

Sept 24: School Pictures K-11; 8:00; Preschool welcome at 7:45 am

Sept 25: Parent Teacher Conferences, 5:00-8:00 pm

Sept 26: No School, Parent/Teacher Conferences 8:00-Noon

Sept 26: V FB @ Burwell 7:00

Sept 27: V VB @ Brady, 9:00

Sept 29: JV VB Mid Plains Tourney, TBA

Sept 29: JH VB/FB, JV FB v. Twin Loup @ Callaway; 2:30, 4:30, 5:30

Sept 30: JV/V VB v. Ansley-Litchfield @ Callaway; 5:30/6:30

Shel Silverstein

 

 

Project Title:  Awesome Authors

shelcollage: Software Used:  Photo Editing software (Photoshop or iPhoto), Internet, Word, Power Point (sometimes), etc. depending on student desire

Subject and Grade Level:  9-12 Creative Writing or 11th grade American author study

Intergrated Subject Areas Also Covered:  Some history if you focus on pop culture that contributed to author’s writing.

Standards:  12.1.3, 12.1.4, 12.2.1, 12.2.2, 12.2.3, 12.2.4, 12.3.2

Example:

Suggestions:  I usually start by discussing what creative writers can learn through reading the works of established authors.  I also tell them about the quote that imitation is the greatest form of flattery.  I also really allow them the choice in an author and genre that they would like to research and imitate.

Materials needed:  It depends on the students choice of authors and their idea for sharing their author.  I’ve had some students create bulletin boards, make Power Points, make a web page, and present skits from the author’s life.

Lesson Plans/Directions:  I like to give students a chance to research authors that they admire and imitate the author’s style.  We first choose the author and read several examples from that author.  Most of my students either prefer short stories or poetry; however, I have also had a student research Authur Miller.  I use the first week letting students read works from the author and research the life of the author and what’s happening in pop culture at the time.  The second week is spent imitating the author’s style.  Students do the pre-writing, revision, and editing stages until they have a final copy that they are proud to share.  The final week is spent allowing the student to create a way to spotlight the author.  Most of my students prefer to spotlight the author in bulletin boards or web pages, but it’s amazing how creative the students are!!

My lesson plans for this activity are very open because it’s a creative writing class and students are self-motivated.  It also allows students to blossom rather than achieve pre-set heights.  I usually have each student do one author study during the year and rotate who does it, but I always start with my over achievers so they can inspire newer students.

Project Title:  “Imitation is The Best Form of Flattery”

Software Used:  Internet, Word, Power Point (sometimes), Drawing programs, etc. depending on student desire

Subject and Grade Level:  7th or 8th grade poetry unit, 9-12 Creative Writing or 11th grade American author study

Standards:  12.1.3, 12.1.4, 12.2.1, 12.2.2, 12.2.3, 12.2.4, 12.3.2

Example:

Suggestions:  I usually start by discussing what creative writers can learn through reading the works of established authors.  I also tell them about the quote that imitation is the greatest form of flattery.  I also emphasize my love of this poet from a very young age. His style of writing creates a clear pathway for people to begin loving poetry. His style is easy to read, with concrete images, and a fun rhyme that changes based on each poem.

Materials needed:I like to have several copies of Shell Silverstein’s books on hand for the students to look through after the initial poetry reading.

Lesson Plans/Directions:I like to begin with reading three of Silverstein’s poems from his book Where the Sidewalk Ends:

  • “Hector the Collector”
  • Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out”
  • “Sick”

As I read each one outloud I like to have the kids try to identify the different types of rhyme used. We also discuss that each of the poems is a very vivid mental image. We talk about concrete descriptive nouns and the use of adjectives.

The first step of the assignment is to brainstorm possible places were you might find a long list of interesting items. Examples could include:

  • A mother’s purse
  • under a child’s bed (even if only in their imagination
  • a farmer’s workshop
  • a toybox
  • a junk drawer
  • a cd cabinet
  • a shoe store

Once the students take off with brainstorming from this initial list, then I remind them that the poems also tell a story. You have a character who does something (collects, fakes being sick or refused to take the garbage out) and ends with the character learning something (they think their junk is treasure, they are not sick on Saturdays, or that they should take the garbage out).

The easiest way to start would be to make a list of what might be in the “location.” Then, once the list is more complete, it easier to find rhymes and begin crafting lines and outline the “story” of the poem.

My lesson plans for this activity are very open because it’s a creative writing class and students are self-motivated.  It also allows students to blossom rather than achieve pre-set heights.